Brain Injuries


Common Causes of Brain Injuries


Posted By on Dec 3, 2015

As a result of its job of controlling the complete human body, the brain is, hence, regarded, as the human body’s most important part. Any force or blow, therefore that’ll influence the brain and harm it may affect how it functions which, consequently, may change the way the human body as a whole operates.

An explosion or a blast, an automobile wreck, or a diversion- related activity or injury, that could cause a strong blow to the head may make his/her brain bump against the skull’s internal walls. This can cause bruising of the brain, neural fibers getting ripped or hemorrhage which, consequently, can lead to an intracranial injury or traumatic brain injury (TBI).

According to the website of Habush Habush & Rottier S.C., you will find times when the symptoms and indications of TBI are perhaps not instantly clear after a collision. Gradually these symptoms may show themselves, yet, through neck pains, constant headaches, changes in sleep routine, slowed thinking, discussing, acting or studying, moodiness and vertigo. When symptoms, however, will contain continued vomiting, tingling or convulsion of the limbs and slurred speech, then it best that the individual is delivered to the hospital for treatment and the mandatory evaluations.

A brain injury could be a serious form of injury, consequences varying depending on the region or the specific part of the brain that has been affected. While some harms could be light, resulting merely to lost or short term headaches states, a serious head injury can lead to death, impairment, amnesia or, worse, coma.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a brain injury (TBI) may also be caused by: a smashed part of skull infiltrating the brain’s cells; the brain hitting a solid object (including pavement) throughout a bicycle accident; a gunshot wound in the head; and, falls, which is extremely common in children and seniors.

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Types of Brain Damage


Posted By on Jul 22, 2013

A physically traumatic event can result in brain damage, such as in a vehicular accident. But to say that there is brain damage can mean a lot of things. The damage may be mild and temporary and may resolve without any treatment. Alternatively, according to the Perth Amboy-based law firm Levinson Axelrod, P.A., brain damage can be extremely severe, resulting in permanent and total disability or death. The type of brain damage will depend on the amount and location of the force, and what portions of the brain was affected. Below are some of the more common types of brain damage.

Concussion

When the brain is subjected to a sudden and violent force, cranial nerves and blood vessels may be affected, causing disorientation, dizziness, and/or loss of coordination, consciousness, and memory. It is not easy to diagnose, which is why patients who sustained a blow to the head or involved in a vehicular accident are required to keep conscious for 24 hours after to report on symptoms. There is no treatment for a concussion, and may take a few months to a few years to heal. Occasionally, a blood clot can form which can lead to death. Concussions are the most common types of brain damage.

Contusion

When the brain bleeds from direct impact to the head, this is called a contusion. Small ones may be left alone to resolve by itself, but large ones may have to be removed surgically. There are several types of contusions, including:

  • Coup-Contrecoup Injury – the force is hard enough that the brain is “bounced off” the wall of the skull, creating contusions at both the original point of impact and at the opposite side
  • Diffuse Axonal Injury – when rotational forces, such as in a car accident occur, the violent movement causes the axons from all over the brain to shear away, causing interruptions in the firing of information from the brain to the body and vice versa. The effects can be temporary or permanent, depending on the amount of force and the site of shearing.

There are other types of brain damage. The aforementioned are simply the most common that occurs in car accidents. If you or someone close to you sustained any form of brain damage as a result of the negligent actions of a third party, you may have a case for a personal injury claim.

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